Tools

Vulnerabilities and threats to your library’s technological infrastructure can be opposed through proper computer, communications and physical security.

Check out the following list of tools. They have been included to help create a library plan that addresses network security issues.

Wired for Success: A Tool for Understanding Your Wireless Network

A wireless network is similar to a wired network, but instead of using cables, it communicates using radio frequency signals. There are dozens of different flavors of wireless networking: Cell phones, satellites and radios all communicate wirelessly. For the purposes of this program, however, the term “wireless networking” refers to a technique for interconnecting computers wirelessly at the building level. This kind of wireless network is sometimes described as wi-fi, an 802.11 network or a “wireless local access network (LAN)” or “WLAN.” These networks have a radius of 300 feet under ideal circumstances.

At a minimum, there are three pieces to a wireless network:

  • First, there’s the wireless access point. The center of a wireless network acts like the hub, or switch, of your wired network, though it also has many of the features of a standard router. On one side, it connects to the Internet, usually through a standard Ethernet cable, and on the other side, it broadcasts a wireless signal
  • Also, there are “wireless devices.” These are the computers and gadgets that use the access point in order to hook into your network and your Internet connection. The first wireless device that comes to mind for most people is a laptop computer. However, there are hundreds of gadgets that can access wireless networks these days. Library patrons use cell phones, smartphones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal gaming devices (like Playstation) and more to connect themselves to wireless networks. Through the rest of this book, “laptop” will be used as shorthand for all of the wireless devices out there.
  • Each wireless device has a wireless network adapter — a specific piece of hardware that connects a computer to a WLAN. Wireless adapters come in all shapes and sizes. Some adapters are built into the computer. Others need to be purchased separately and then plugged into the Universal Serial Bus (USB) port or PC Card port.

A Basic Wireless Network

Wireless Options Comparison Chart

The following chart is an overview of some wireless options.

SOLUTION
WHY? COST
TIME AND LABOR
Access point
Basic wireless connectivity
$50 to $80
One to two hours
Wireless gateway
Increased control over your wireless network
$500 to $1500
Variable, depending on what features you want, but gateways are more difficult to configure than a regular access point
Hotspot provider
Ease of maintenance
$500 to $1000 startup cost and $50 per month
Depends on your package, but providers often perform all setup and troubleshooting for you and your patrons
A second Internet connection
Improved security
$25 to $50 per month
One to two hours
A firewall with separate VLANs
Improved security
$500 to $1500
Variable, but firewalls are complex devices, and you may need outside help to configure it properly

Note: Sorting through the variations of this approach can be confusing. You might want to talk to an experienced network consultant first.

Quick Checklist for Setting Your Wireless Access Policy

Use this “Quick Look” checklist to make sure you’re covering your bases when it comes to crafting a wireless policy for your library.

  • Check your existing Internet (Computer) Use Policy. Do you need to add anything to it relating to use of the wireless? You may decide that it covers your situation. However, do keep in mind the following possible additions:
    • Network Security: If you’re providing a fairly open network, consider a disclaimer about the possibility of radio signals (wireless) being intercepted. This is more specific to wireless than the equally useful disclaimers in your Internet policy about how the “library is not responsible for lost data due to network failure” and “beware of viruses” and “be careful about transmitting your personal information on an open network.”
    • Network Availability: WLANs can be flaky, and patron laptops can be even more so. Note that they may lose signal at random and the library takes no responsibility for lost data, etc.
    • Limitations on Use: Time limits, bandwidth limits, no FTP, no telnet, no streaming content. Do you offer printing? Web-based email only (no SMTP server)?
    • Personal Equipment Security: Warn patrons that the library is not responsible for stolen equipment, lost data due to their equipment failure, etc.
    • Filtering: Note if the wireless access is filtered, especially if the in-house is not, or is only partially filtered (filter by patron choice only, for instance). You may want to quote any law (CIPA) relating to this in brief.
    • Support: Will your library staff provide help with patron laptops? Can they provide help with determining if there is a signal present (i.e., if the APs are working)? If you don’t want staff touching patron laptops due to liability, say so.
  • Make sure your staff are kept in the loop about any wireless initiatives, in particular about what they’ll be expected to offer in the way of support for patrons. This sounds silly, but wireless initiatives can happen so quickly that staff may not have time to become aware of all the issues involved, especially what patrons will ask them.
  • Promote the Policy: How will you notify users of the policy? Do they have to sign off on it before they can use your system? Will you print it out and post it? Put it on your Web site? Use a captive portal or similar product to force users to agree to the policy?
  • Get Policy Approval: Any policy should be run by your board or advising committee, and preferably your university or city attorney, to be sure the language is appropriate both for liability and also in line with your existing policies.
Adapted with permission from: Wireless Networking: A How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians by Louise Alcorn and Maryellen Mott Allen. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2006.

Where and How to Find Vulnerabilities

POSSIBLE VULNERABILITIESWHAT TO CONSIDER
Patrons can access the staff network
Use your networking equipment (e.g., router, switch, firewall) to create separate sub­-networks for patron computing and staff computing. Network administrators often use Virtual LANs (VLANs) and firewalls to accomplish this. This step is especially important if you have a wireless network for patrons. Some of those laptops will be riddled with viruses and malware. Also, while most patrons have no interest in hacking your network, there's no point in tempting them. For more information on wireless security, see Chapter One of Recipes for a 5-Star Library.
You don't have control of critical data
Where do you keep your patron data, circulation records, financial documents, staff documents and critical databases? Make sure you have a list of all the mission­-critical data collections in your library, where they're stored, how they're backed up and who has access to them.
You haven't secured your servers
Devices that connect directly to the Internet must be secured. Do you have servers (e.g., Web servers or e­mail servers) exposed to the Internet or your public network? Have the servers been "hardened" by removing all unnecessary applications, services and user accounts? You should not have a Web server that has additional services running beyond what it needs to complete its primary function. The exact steps for hardening a server depend on your configuration, but you should look for advice and see if there are any software tools that might help (e.g., the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer).
You aren't taking basic precautions
All PCs should have the latest operating system updates, the latest software patches and up ­to ­date virus definitions. As much as possible, try to automate these updates so they aren't forgotten. For more information, see Chapter Two of A Cookbook for Small and Rural Libraries.
You haven't paid attention to physical security
Who has the keys to your building? Are there locks on your server room? Who has keys to that room? Do you have any computers in far-off corners of the library where your staff has a hard time seeing them? If you check out laptops and other equipment to the public, have you thought about theft prevention?
You aren't backing up critical data on a regular basis
For more information on backup tools and strategies, see Backing Up Your Data at TechSoup.
You aren't testing your backups
We've heard a few horror stories about libraries who thought they had backups, only to find that the backup tapes were blank or unusable. For more information, see Worst Practices: Don't Test Your Backups at TechRepublic.
You're using weak passwords
For advice on choosing good passwords, read Strong Passwords and Password Security at Microsoft.com.
You have not addressed possible internal security threats
Many surveys show that internal security breaches are the most common type. Departing, bored and disgruntled employees are potential problems that we sometimes overlook. Design your network with limited and appropriate access. Create policies regarding the process for changing of passwords. When an employee leaves, delete or suspend their user accounts immediately.
Your staff doesn't understand the risks of social engineering
Social engineering is a technique that hackers use to trick people into divulging private, secure information. It's still one of the leading causes of security breaches. For example, an employee might receive a phone call from someone who claims to work for your Internet service provider or other technical support. The caller says that he's fixing a problem and needs the user's password to test a possible solution. The employee hands over the information without verifying the caller's identity.

Firewalls at a Glance

With so many firewall products on the market, trying to fit each into a specific category would be nearly impossible. The following categories provide generalized descriptions of the most typical firewalls for different­-sized library networks. The manufacturers listed do not represent recommendations nor are they restricted to any particular category;they are meant to provide common names for each category.

TYPEPRICE RANGEDESCRIPTIONCOMMON MANUFACTURERS
Basic – Firewall commonly found in homes, small offices and small libraries.
From $50­ - $150
These firewalls provide basic port forwarding, packet filtering and logging. Although the specification may claim to support more connections, these are generally designed to support networks with 5-­10 computers.
Belkin, D­Link, Linksys and Netgear
Mid­range – These firewalls, made by Watchguard, Symantec and Sonicwall, are found in medium-sized libraries with more specific needs and with 10-­50 computers.
From $300­ - $700
These firewalls provide more advanced, stateful packet inspection and technologies such as VPN, user authentication, and content filtering.
Watchguard, Symantec and Sonicwall
Advanced – For larger library systems, advanced firewalls offer very high capacity and feature-­rich devices.
From $2,000 to well into five­ figures
You will not find these in most small to medium libraries.
Cisco, Checkpoint and Juniper

Network Performance Metrics Defined

TERMHOW IT APPLIES TO YOU

Latency

  • Refers to the amount of time (usually measured in milliseconds) it takes for data to travel from one location to another across a network (or across the Internet, which is a network itself).
  • Is sometimes referred to as delay, because your software is often waiting to execute some function while data travels back and forth across the network. For example, Internet Explorer can’t display a story from CNN.com until CNN’s Web servers respond to your request for that page.
  • Is often less than 100 milliseconds on today’s high­-speed network, which has very little impact on Web surfing.
If you’d like a more thorough explanation, see It’s the Latency, Stupid and It’s Still the Latency, Stupid.

Generally, you only need to be concerned about latency in two situations:

  • When your staff and patrons complain about a slow connection, high latency could be part of the problem, though you might not be able to do anything about it other than contact your ISP and ask them to address the issue.
  • Second, if you’re planning to install Voice over IP (VoIP) or any other application that relies on live, real­-time transmission of video or audio, you need to ask your service provider about their latency. Real­-time voice and video applications are sensitive to network delays. For instance, with VoIP, you’ll notice that the audio is choppy, with lots of pauses and dropped syllables. Jitter refers to variation in the amount of latency, and it has a similar negative impact on real­-time communication.

 

Bandwidth and throughput

These two terms are sometimes used interchangeably, and though they are related, they’re not quite the same. They both refer to the amount of data transferred between two points on a network in a given period of time. In other words, how many bits per second can you send across your network or over your Internet connection?

On a day-­to-­day basis, you’ll usually see them measured in Kbps (kilobits per second), Mbps (megabits per second) or Gbps (gigabits per second). Bandwidth generally refers to a theoretical maximum, while throughput is a real­-world, practical measurement. The distinction is relevant because ISPs will usually advertise their bandwidth, which is often higher than the throughput that you’ll actually receive. In other contexts, you’ll see the terms bandwidth, throughput and speed used interchangeably.

Bandwidth vs. latency

If you’re still having trouble grasping the difference between latency and bandwidth (or throughput), this analogy from the Gentoo Linux wiki might help: “Latency is a measure of the time a packet needs to get from point A to point B. Bandwidth measures the amount of data that got from A to B in a certain time. So, if you were to take a dictionary to your friend on the other side of town, your bandwidth would be good, but the latency would be bad (the time spent driving, to be exact). However, if you were to phone your friend and start reading the dictionary to him, the latency would be lower, but the bandwidth would be substantially less than in the first example.”

Uptime or responsiveness

Uptime, sometimes referred to as availability or responsiveness, refers to the amount of time that a computer or a network connection is functioning and usable.

If you’re buying a leased line, the ISP’s guarantee with regard to uptime should be written into the Service Level Agreement. You also want to measure the uptime of your own hardware and software equipment to see if a device has a recurring problem.

Hardware and software

Your network relies on switches, servers, routers and firewalls, so network monitors can usually track metrics such as CPU utilization, remaining hard drive space and memory use. Also, by sending messages to your Web site, your OPAC and other key applications, your network monitor can track the responsiveness of mission-­critical services and software.

Etc.

There are hundreds of data points you could track on your network, so you’ll have to spend some time talking to your vendor or wading through the documentation.

Ten Factors to Consider when Shopping for a Telecom Provider

  1. Business vs. residential: ISPs usually distinguish between the services they market to businesses and the services they market to home users. Residential customers can usually choose between dial­-up, cable Internet, DSL and, in some areas, Fiber to the Home (FTTH). Business customers often have several additional options to choose from such as Frame Relay, Metro Ethernet, SONET and SDSL. The underlying technologies and protocols shouldn’t be your first concern, and the exact menu of choices varies a lot from city to city. What’s important here is that business-­class connections provide more reliability, greater upload speeds and other advantages important to some nonprofits. On the downside, business-­class connections usually cost a lot more. If your needs are limited you might not need a business grade connection. On the other hand, ISPs don’t always offer residential broadband service to office buildings and organizational customers.
  2. Reliability and service level agreements: Most business-­class Internet connections come with assurances regarding “uptime” and other metrics. In other words, your ISP might guarantee that 99.9 percent of the time your connection will work, and they promise to refund some of your money if they fail to meet that target. Also, they often make promises with regard to throughput, latency, dropped packets and other measures. These promises are usually captured in a Service Level Agreement (SLA). Bear in mind that your ISP only makes these promises with regard to service between your building and the edge of the ISP’s network (where it connects to the Internet backbone). Beyond that they have no control. Also, if you have several connections from the same provider, your ISP may make assurances about average, across­-the-­board metrics. For instance, if they promise a monthly average of 99.8 percent uptime across ten high­-speed connections, that leaves them a lot of leeway. Your main Internet connection could be down for roughly 14 hours a month and they’d still be within the terms of the SLA. Pay close attention to this type of detail. An example of an SLA can be found at Speakeasy.net.
  3. How long does the contract last? ISPs will sometimes offer reduced rates in exchange for a long-term contract. Be cautious about any contract that lasts for more than two years. The services, prices, providers and technologies are changing all the time in the Internet access market. When a cheaper, faster service shows up in your community a year from now, you don’t want to be locked into a four-­year contract.
  4. Equipment and installation costs: Residential plans usually have very low setup costs. You pay $50 to $75 for a modem and a $25 to $50 installation fee. On the other hand, for some business-­class Internet connections, the equipment can cost thousands. For example, if you buy a T-­1 connection, you need a CSU/DSU and a router, both of which can cost a thousand or more. Also, the installation and setup fees are usually much higher. You can roll some of these initial costs into your monthly bill by renting equipment from your ISP. In other words, you’ll trade lower up-­front costs for higher ongoing costs.
  5. Uploading vs. downloading: Uploading, or upstream, refers to the transfer of data from within your local area network to machines outside your network, and downloading is the reverse. We spend most of our time on the Internet downloading Web pages, files, audio streams, etc., as do our patrons. However, since libraries host Web sites, email servers, Web-­accessible online catalogs and other services, your ability to send data upstream over your Internet connection is nearly as important as your download speed. In fact, with more and more patrons uploading videos, photos and other large files to sites such as YouTube and Flickr, you should think about upload speeds even if you aren’t hosting a Web site or an OPAC in your building. Most broadband connections marketed to home users (e.g., DSL and cable) are asymmetric. In other words, the upload speed is much lower than the download bandwidth. With DSL, for example, your download rate might be 1-Mbps, while your bandwidth for uploading is only 150-Kbps. In fact, residential service contracts from some ISPs expressly forbid the hosting of Web sites and other online services. On the other hand, business-­class broadband connections usually provide more bandwidth for uploading. If you have a leased line (e.g., a T­-1 line), your upload and download speeds are usually the same. SDSL is another synchronous technology that’s often used for business-­grade Internet access.
  6. Scalability: If you need more bandwidth a year from now, will your existing networking equipment and data lines handle the extra traffic? How much will your ISP charge you to upgrade the connection?
  7. Integrated voice and data service: Ten years ago, most companies sent their phone traffic over one connection and their data over another, and these lines were often purchased from different providers. It’s more and more common to get both services from the same vendor, over the same lines, sharing much of the same equipment. For example, you can lease a T-­1 line from your phone company and use half of it for Internet traffic and half for phone traffic, and a single device can handle routing and security for both services. Also, bear in mind that some networking technologies can allocate bandwidth dynamically while others can’t. In other words, if the voice section of your high­-speed line is empty because nobody’s making a call, can staff and patrons use that bandwidth to surf the Web?
  8. Managed services: If you have the required expertise, you can manage your own routers and the other networking equipment you need for Internet access. However, most ISPs offer a managed option where they handle all the configuration and troubleshooting. Sometimes the managed equipment still resides in your building, but in other cases, it’s hosted by your ISP. When it’s time to dispose of the router or the firewall, the service provider takes care of it. Obviously, you pay more for this type of service.
  9. How does this impact e-­rate? If you plan to buy new equipment or upgrade your Internet connection, how will it impact your e­-rate application? If you plan to change service providers and you apply for discounts under Priority 1, make sure your new provider is an eligible telecommunications carrier. Also, the cost of on­-premises telecommunications equipment is often eligible for e­-rate discounts under Priority 1 if the equipment is integral to the provision of the high­-speed connection. For a short explanation of what’s eligible under e­-rate and what isn’t, see Appendix G of Recipes for a 5-­Star Library. For the long explanation, see the 2008 eligible services list.
  10. Redundancy: Do you have more than one way to get to the Internet? Sooner or later a construction crew will cut a line somewhere in your town, or a transformer will blow up. Some ISPs can provide redundancy by selling you two data lines that connect to the ISPs network at two different locations. In other words, you can lease two T­-1 lines that terminate at two different Points of Presence (or POP, which just refers to a phone company facility near your building). If that’s too expensive, you could lease a single T­-1 from the phone company and buy cable Internet service or dial­up service as a backup solution in case your primary line goes down. Of course, you should only consider this if 24x7 Internet access is critical to the operation of your library. For anything besides dial­-up access, you’ll pay a lot of money for a redundant connection that you might need only once or twice a year.

Bandwidth Management Techniques — Tips and Actions

BANDWIDTH MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUEDESCRIPTIONTIPS AND ACTIONS
Traffic shapers limit the speed and bandwidth available to certain data streams.
You can limit a particular type of application (e.g., specify that traffic from file­-sharing software can never exceed 200 Kbps), or you can specify how much bandwidth is available to each user. This technique is sometimes known as packet shaping or bandwidth limiting.
  • Limiting by type of application (or port number) is occasionally difficult because software can be designed to use random port numbers to communicate in order to evade traffic shapers.
  • Also, port 80 (the HTTP port for standard Web traffic) handles a wide variety of different data, and you don’t want to throttle it all indiscriminately.
  • Most traffic shapers can handle these routine evasive maneuvers by inspecting each packet of data carefully.
  • Investigate your packet­-shaping tool to see what kinds of distinctions it can make. For example, can it tell the difference between Web audio and Web video? Can't recognize BitTorrent traffic, regardless of the port it’s traveling across?
Quality of Service (QoS) complements packet shaping, and it often requires packet shaping to work effectively.
Packet shaping delays and limits low­-priority Internet traffic, which makes room for higher-­priority traffic. QoS, in turn, prioritizes the important or delay-­sensitive network traffic, making sure it gets sent out before other traffic streams and guaranteeing that it arrives at its destination within a specified time frame (e.g., under 100 milliseconds). Real-­time media, such as voice, video and online gaming, react badly to latency and jitter, so they often need QoS. For instance, latency above 145 milliseconds makes Voice over IP calls unlistenable. On the other hand, most of us can surf the Web at much higher latencies without noticing a serious delay, so there’s no point in applying QoS to ordinary Web traffic.
  • To obtain true QoS, with guaranteed latency and bit rates, you need to have some control over the entire network connection, including the equipment at both ends and all the circuits and routers in between. Usually, this means you have to pay your service provider for higher-­quality point­-to­-point connections (aka leased lines), because you can’t guarantee QoS over the public Internet.
  • On the flip side, you can implement packet shaping on one end of a network connection, so it’s often cheaper and less difficult to set up. Packet shapers can usually prioritize certain traffic streams, but they can’t guarantee delivery the way an end­-to­-end QoS connection can.
WAN optimization doesn’t discriminate between traffic streams the way packet shapers and QoS devices do. Instead, optimizers use a variety of techniques to strip out the inefficiencies and redundancies from network traffic. In other words, an optimizer speeds up all the traffic that passes through it.
Compression and caching are two basic techniques that optimizers use, but there are a variety of advanced algorithms that we won’t get into here. As with the other devices that we’ve discussed, WAN optimizers usually reside at the edge of your network, behind your router or firewall.
  • With certain types of WAN optimizers, you need a device at both ends of the network connection. For example, to take advantage of compression, you need a device at the far end of the connection that’s capable of decompressing.
Web caching is a piece of software or hardware that saves copies of recently accessed pages in memory or on a hard drive in order to speed up retrieval.
If you have 200 patrons surfing the Web on any given day, chances are that they’re accessing the same sites over and over again. Some of these sites are saved, or cached, in the Web browser on each individual desktop computer. If you return to a story you were reading half an hour ago, you don’t have to wait while your browser pulls down a fresh copy from a remote Web site. Instead, your browser shows you the version contained in the browser’s local cache. However, this only helps your personal connection. If the patron next to you wants access to the same article, they can’t get it from your local cache. They have to send another request to the remote Web server and download the same article that you downloaded half an hour ago. A Web­ caching server acts like a big shared cache for the entire network. All the PCs on the network can be configured to check the server first to see if a copy of the desired page has already been retrieved for someone else.
  • Some Web pages are constantly updated (e.g., weather information or stock quotes), and other sites are fairly static.
  • Obviously, your caching server shouldn’t hold and redistribute a page of stock quotes that someone retrieved two hours ago.
  • Any request for time­-sensitive information should bypass the caching server. Fortunately, most Web pages contain this information. A field in the page header will tell your caching server how long the page should be held.

Network Inventory

As with anything IT-related, you have the option to automate all or part of your network inventory. Many different types of software (e.g., asset management programs, network management programs, network inventory tools) have the ability to scan your network and collect information about your existing equipment. However, it takes time to find the right tool, learn it, and integrate it with your networking equipment. If you don’t have a large network, or don’t have the time to investigate network inventory software, use the worksheets provided here.

At the end of each inventory sheet, we’ve included space below for you to record administrative logon information. As always, be careful about how you handle sensitive usernames and passwords. It’s often a good idea to record usernames and passwords in a separate, encrypted file. Also, regardless of how you record logon information, be sure to protect these worksheets and any IT documentation. Even without passwords, a hacker could use the information to compromise your network.

Switch

MAKE/MODEL
LOCATION
IP ADDRESS
VLAN INFO (IF ANY)
    IP    

Subnet Mask

 
Gateway  
ADMIN LOGON CONNECTED TO
SPEED SERIAL #
ASSET TAG #


     
PORTS
DATE PURCHASED
PURCHASE ORDER #
TECH SUPPORT PHONE NUMBER
TOTAL FREE
     
   
NOTES

Wireless Access Point

MAKE/MODEL
LOCATION
IP ADDRESS (WIRELESS SIDE)
IP ADDRESS (WIRED SIDE)
    IP
  IP
 
Subnet Mask
  Subnet Mask
 
Gateway
  Gateway
 
SSID (i.e., the name of your wireless network)
ADMIN USERNAME AND PASSWORD
WIRELESS SECURITY KEY (IF ANY)
SERIAL #
ASSET TAG #


     
DHCP INFO
DATE PURCHASED
PURCHASE ORDER #
TECH SUPPORT PHONE NUMBER


     
NOTES

Router

MAKE/MODEL
LOCATION
INTERNAL ADDRESS
EXTERNAL ADDRESS
    Static?
  Static?
 
Router IP
  Router IP
 
Subnet Mask
  Subnet Mask
 
Gateway   Gateway
 
ADMIN LOGON REMOTE ACCESS WHERE IS THE CONFIGURATION FILE?
SERIAL #
ASSET TAG #


     
PORTS DATE PURCHASED
PURCHASE ORDER #
TECH SUPPORT PHONE NUMBER
TOTAL FREE
     
   
NOTES

Firewall

MAKE/MODEL
LOCATION
INTERNAL ADDRESS
EXTERNAL ADDRESS
    Static?
  Static?
 
Firewall IP
  Firewall IP
 
Subnet Mask
  Subnet Mask
 
Gateway   Gateway
 
ADMIN LOGON REMOTE ACCESS WHERE IS THE CONFIGURATION FILE?
SERIAL #
ASSET TAG #


     
PORTS DATE PURCHASED
PURCHASE ORDER #
TECH SUPPORT PHONE NUMBER
TOTAL FREE
     
   
NOTES

Internet Connection Hardware

EQUIPMENT TYPE (E.G., CABLE MODEL)
MAKE/MODEL
INTERNAL ADDRESS
EXTERNAL ADDRESS
    Static?
  Static?
 
Hardware IP
  Hardware IP
 
Subnet Mask
  Subnet Mask
 
Gateway   Gateway
 
ADMIN LOGON REMOTE ACCESS INFO
LOCATION
SERIAL #
ASSET TAG #


     
CONNECTION SPEED (E.G., 1.54 MBPS) DATE PURCHASED
PURCHASE ORDER #
TECH SUPPORT PHONE NUMBER


     
NOTES

Other Network Information

DHCP Server

Server Name
 
IP Address
 
Subnet Mask
 
Gateway
 
Physical Location
 
Range 1
 
Exceptions
 
Range 2
 
Exceptions
 
Range 3
 
Exceptions  
Notes  

DNS Information

Primary DNS Server
 
IP Address
 
Who Hosts It?
 
Notes  
   
Secondary DNS Server
 
IP Address
 
Who Hosts It?
 
Notes  

Web Site

Web Site URL
 
Web Server Software
 
Root File Directory
 
FTP Server Name
 
FTP logon Info
 
Web Server Software
 
(if hosted internally)
 
Server Name
 
Physical Location
 
IP Address
 
Subnet Mask
 
Gateway
 
   
(if hosted by a third party)
 
Web Hosting Company
 
Web Host Contact Info
 
Account Management URL
 
Account Management Logon Info
 
Monthly Bandwidth/Storage Limits
 
Cost
 
   
Notes
 

Domain Registration

Domain Name  
Registrar Name
 
Registered Admin Contact
 
Registered Technical Contact
 
Registration Login Information
 
Contact Email  
Expiration Date
 
Last Renewed