10 June 2015 - 3:42pm | by Ariel Gilbert-Knight

This post was originally published on the TechSoup blog. As our fiscal year comes to a close, we wanted to reflect on what resonated with our members this year. While some issues, such as Internet security and technology training, might resonate stronger with libraries than say, crowdfunding, we thought you'd find this list interesting. 

Fiscal year end is a time of reflection here at TechSoup. Well … reflection and crunching epic piles of data. We're reviewing what worked well this year and what we can improve for next year. This includes understanding what you, our nonprofit community, found most interesting in 2014–2015.

Here are the top 10 reasons you tuned in to the TechSoup blog this year.

29 May 2015 - 2:27pm | by TechSoup Announcements

This post originally appeared on the TechSoup blog. Did your library request any of these products this year? Tell us what you got and how you used it in the comments!

Cheerleaders and fans at a high school pep rally

It's time! You've been waiting all fiscal year to find out what the top 10 TechSoup products are for 2015. Are you on #TeamMicrosoft or #TeamSymantec? Get your final bets in now.

28 May 2015 - 3:35pm | by Ale Bezdikian

This post originally appeared on the TechSoup.org blog. We thought the library audience would be interested in these apps for a few reasons: storytelling, copyright issues, and potential privacy violations. Read on to learn TechSoup's Ale Bezdikian's musings on the Periscope and Meerkat apps.   

 

someone's hand holding a phone up at a concert to film it

The nonprofit sector thrives on a community of rich storytelling. Whatever form that storytelling takes, from photo essay to member video, story-driven content is dynamic, shows impact, and can attract new potential donors. Many of these stories, however, are only as good as their delivery strategy or the platforms used to connect them to wider audiences. And that's where live streaming can be useful.

27 May 2015 - 3:52pm | by Ginny Mies

This post was originally published on the TechSoup.org blog. At the Innovative Libraries Online Conference, we got a lot of questions about Microsoft's Software Assurance and the Volume Licensing Service Center. We thought calling out some of the top benefits will be useful for other libraries that have received Microsoft donations through TechSoup. 

If your nonprofit or public library received donated Microsoft software through TechSoup, you probably used the Volume Licensing Service Center (VLSC) to get your software. But did you know there are special perks from Microsoft, too?

In case you're not familiar, the VLSC is an online tool for managing Microsoft Volume Licensing agreements, downloading products, and accessing volume license keys. Microsoft includes two years of Software Assurance with all Volume Licensing products it donates through TechSoup.

Software Assurance is a collection of benefits included with Microsoft products requested through TechSoup. Here are five — no, wait, six! — great and unexpected benefits you can take advantage of via this program.

22 May 2015 - 11:52am | by Phil Shapiro

As a maker, I love nimble. Nimble means able to move fast. The state of Delaware was nimble when it was the first to ratify the U.S. Constitution. Today, the state is moving fast to bring making and creativity to its public libraries.

I noticed on Twitter that the person spearheading this is Sarena Fletcher, an administrative librarian for Delaware Division of Libraries. I caught up with Sarena recently to hear her story, recorded in this short audio interview on YouTube. 

I loved hearing from Sarena how the Delaware libraries are working in partnership with the Barrel of Makers makerspace to teach Scratch computer programming classes at the libraries. The only other makerspace I know of that's partnering with a public library is the Santa Barbara Makerspace in California.

21 May 2015 - 11:41am | by Laura Kindsvater

This post originally appeared on the TechSoup blog. Because librarians sometimes need to think like graphic designers (think program flyers, website redesigns, and posters!), we thought the TechSoup for Libraries community would find it useful.   

 

Vermeer painting of Girl with a Pearl Earring with the girl holding a camera

The future is a visual one. These days, people often share images that communicate a wealth of nuanced information (rather than relying on words), and visual literacy is becoming a requirement. Given this new reality, how can we communicate with and engage our communities?

Meggan Frost, public services librarian for Paul Smith's College in upstate New York, gave a knockout presentation on graphic design recently for the Nebraska Library Commission. She explained that when something is designed well, it makes us want to get closer to it. It makes us pay attention.

She offered four fundamentals of graphic design to guide us in creating materials that will engage others, as well as three useful shortcuts — plus some bonus information on how to find inspiration.

Here are Meggan's tips on the four fundamentals of graphic design.

18 May 2015 - 10:45am | by Jim Lynch

Homework wordcloud

According to a 2013 ALA survey, almost all U.S. public libraries now offer online and in-person homework assistance?. In rural areas, this service is especially important because the library offers high-speed broadband access that many homes can't afford.

Urban areas have their own challenges that also include lack of Internet access. We decided to have a look at what is working well — and not so well — in the world of library homework help programs.

Pew Research finds that 54 percent of teachers say all or almost all of their students have access at school to the digital tools they need to be academically successful, but just 18 percent say the same is true for their students at home. The Miami Herald recently reported on how critical the Miami Dade libraries are in addressing this need.

14 May 2015 - 12:30pm | by Ginny Mies

Last month in our newsletter, we asked our members how they collected Wi-Fi statistics at their respective libraries through a short survey. This month, we're excited to share those results with you!

A Quick Breakdown of the Numbers:

Before we delve into the results, a quick caveat: this is in no way a broad representation of how libraries gather statistics. There was a total of 27 respondents to our survey, so we can't draw any general conclusions about how libraries gather statistics, but there is still plenty of advice we wanted to share with other libraries.

Fifty-nine percent of our respondents said that they do collect Wi-Fi statistics.

When we asked how they collected statistics, 31 percent of our respondents said that their Wi-Fi hardware has a built-in tool that gets the job done.

But the largest category of respondents, 47.6 percent, answered that they used a different tool than what we listed (see pie chart below).

14 May 2015 - 11:10am | by Ginny Mies

No matter where they're located, libraries help patrons navigate information about housing, employment, counseling, health, and other important human services. To support making these connections for their communities, libraries have been exploring new tools, programming, and staffing options.

For example, larger libraries, such as the San Francisco Public Library, have hired full-time social workers as part of their staff. The Santa Cruz Public Library, a smaller library, has a community information database.

In our April webinar, TechSoup for Libraries partnered with our friends at WebJunction to hear about how three libraries of varying sizes use social referral services, resources, and programs to support their communities. Our guest speakers were:

The wonderful thing about these programs is that they can easily be adopted by other libraries — both large and small.

13 May 2015 - 11:37am | by Elliot Harmon

This post originally appeared on the TechSoup blog. The Natalia Veteran's Memorial Library has to make hard decisions about how to meet its community's needs on an extraordinarily limited all-donation budget. Here's how the library does it. 

The Natalia Veteran's Memorial Library serves the small town of Natalia, Texas. It's open 25 hours a week, with a staff of one. With extremely limited resources, librarian Amy Edge must make difficult decisions every day about what her library can provide. Whenever she's making those tough decisions, she asks herself which option will do more to improve the lives of Natalia residents.

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