e-books

Why Is It So Hard to Use E-books from the Library?

I would dearly love to say that e-books from the public library are wondrous things. Come to think of it, I did make that case in my post, Why Public Libraries Are Better than Amazon.

However, recently I had occasion to despair of the library e-book experience when I tried to check out Robin Hastings' book — Making the Most of the Cloud: How to Choose and Implement the Best Services for Your Library — from my local library.

A Quick Guide to Making Online Tutorial Videos

The demand from patrons in the Sonoma County Library (SCL) system for e-reader assistance was high — and something needed to be done. At the time, I was working as a part-time circulation technician, and I was aware of the need for something that could help people at home, or that nonprofessional staff like myself could direct people to during busier times at the reference desk.

Why Public Libraries Are Better Than Amazon

Smartphone with bookshelf-e-book library concept.Shutterstock

Librarians and patrons know that public libraries have been quietly developing excellent collections of e-books. But free library e-books got a big publicity splash recently when The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) personal technology writer, Geoffrey Fowler, did a comparison of Amazon's $10 per month Kindle Unlimited service and his local library's free e-book lending.

Fowler's WSJ piece is called Why the Public Library Beats Amazon — for Now. Guess what his conclusion is?

ALA TechSource's "TechTrends:MidWinter 2010" Webinar

Thursday of last week I was disappointed when I realized that I had missed  the Tuesday/Wednesday Technology Essentials online conference organized by WebJunction (fortunately, recordings are available), so my good friend and colleague Brenda Hough gave me her invitation to the ALA TechSource’s TechTrends: MidWinter 2010 webinar featuring short presentations by Jason Griffey, Sean Fitzpatrick, Greg Landgraf and Kate Sheehan.