18 July 2016 - 11:58am | by Adam Lui

This post was originally published on the Community Technology Network's (CTN) blog. CTN's mission is to unite organizations and volunteers to transform lives through digital literacy. We thought libraries, especially those that teach digital literacy classes, would find this blog post useful. 

A connected globe

Becoming digitally literate can be a long journey for many learners. It can seem like an impossible one to those who speak limited or no English.

However, thanks to technology, it has never been easier to eliminate this barrier to digital access. Here are five ways you can increase the effectiveness in which you teach digital literacy as a trainer.

14 July 2016 - 12:29pm | by Ginny Mies

 

privacy keyboard

Patron privacy is an ongoing issue in the library world. In the modern library, data collection is a reality, and customer information is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, data collection allows libraries to understand their patrons better and personalize services. On the other hand, collecting and using patron data is a serious challenge to the library profession's ethical commitment to protecting patron privacy. And it gets even more complicated when this data is handled by a third-party vendor, such as an integrated library system or an online catalog.

For our June webinar, we invited two privacy experts to explore these issues and discuss tips and resources.

13 July 2016 - 9:51am | by Ariel Gilbert-Knight

The following blog post recaps a NetSquared Toronto presentation by Sarah Lesh, a front-end web developer at hjc. You can watch her full, in-depth presentation. As coding is becoming a necessary skill for libraries, we thought this blog post might be useful our audience. 

The Internet can be a confusing place, and often Internet concepts, like coding a website, may seem complicated and overwhelming. That's why we invited Sarah Lesh, a front-end web developer at hjc, to explain the basics of coding, specifically HTML, CSS, and Javascript. But first ...

7 July 2016 - 4:24pm | by Ginny Mies

ALA 2016 logo

If you've ever attended American Library Association's Annual Conference, you'll probably agree with me that it is two things: useful and overwhelming. I generally try to hit as many tech-related sessions as I can with a few author signings thrown in here and there.

But by the time I get home, I look at my massive Google Doc of notes and think, "Wait, what did I learn again?" This year in Orlando, I tried a different technique. As I took notes, I highlighted the key tech tips from the sessions I went to. I've picked out some of my favorites, so if you too are feeling overwhelmed or were not able to go, I hope you find these beneficial to your library's tech goals!

30 June 2016 - 9:44am | by Ariel Gilbert-Knight

Editor's Note: This blog originally appeared on the TechSoup blog. Because Microsoft products are some of the most popular among libraries, we thought this article might be useful for requesting and downloading software. 

 

two people looking at Microsoft software on a laptop

The Microsoft Software Donation Program is by far the most popular of TechSoup's many donation programs. Here's a quick guide to getting the most out of your Microsoft donation requests.

1. Maximize the Number of Microsoft Products You Request

First off, you should know that there's a maximum allotment of Microsoft software donations that eligible organizations can request every two years. Your two-year cycle begins with your first Microsoft donation request. After two years, a new cycle begins, and a new allotment is available.

If you aren't sure when your two-year cycle began or how many more donations you can request during the current cycle, there's an easy way to check. Just go to My Microsoft Donation Center. You'll need to log in to your TechSoup account to see it.

Go to My Microsoft Donation Center

 

21 June 2016 - 11:52am | by Ginny Mies

Recent research from the Pew Institute shows that only 59 percent of older adults go online. New technologies can be difficult to learn, and older adults may not understand the benefits of using technology. But libraries can help older adults adopt technology in meaningful ways for communication, lifelong learning, and entertainment.

Small class at St. Mary's Library

TechSoup for Libraries hosted a webinar in May on teaching older adults technology at the library. We invited the following speakers to share tips and tools:

15 June 2016 - 4:15pm | by Ginny Mies

The #PulseOrlandoSyllabus is a list compiled by librarians and teachers of information resources, teaching materials, books and digital materials focusing on the intersections of LGBTQIA community and people of color. The list includes comics, zines, plays, podcasts, LIS resources, scholarly books, and much more compiled within a 60+ page Google doc.

The result showcases what libraries do best: compiling, collecting, and organizing information to benefit communities. You can share it with your community using this easy-to-remember URL: bit.ly/orlandosyllabus.

13 June 2016 - 10:26am | by Ginny Mies

The cookies are out, the coffee is ready, and people are already starting to file into the lecture you've organized for your library. Just before your speaker starts, you hit Go Live. All of a sudden, people from all over the world are popping into your feed, asking questions and sharing comments on your program. Now your attendance total has tripled, and viewers are sharing your lecture, turning it into an online success!

Live-streamed video is taking off, and it is easier than ever to get on board. You can use live streaming not only to share your programs and lectures but also to give people a virtual tour of your library or share one of your classes. There are so many possibilities! The Wichita Public Library used Facebook Live for a book discussion for Kitchens of the Great Midwest, and the Wilmington Memorial Library used Live to share a program on drones

We tested out a few popular live-streaming platforms to see how they stack up and if they might be right for libraries.

9 June 2016 - 10:48am | by Susan Hope Bard

Calling all children's librarians! We have a series of free webinars on early childhood literacy. Our next live webinar is on Wednesday, June 15 at 11 a.m. Pacific time. This post was originally published on the TechSoup blog.  

two young children using computers at San Jose Public Library

The Early Learning LabFrontiers of Innovation, and New Profit, along with partners Joan Ganz Cooney Center and TechSoup, are working together to build the technology capacity of the early childhood education field.

In partnership with these organizations, TechSoup will be hosting a series of webinars about technology and innovation for early childhood literacy organizations and researchers. If you work with young children at a nonprofit or library, this free webinar series is for you.

8 June 2016 - 1:19pm | by Gary Lutz

In 2014, the Patchogue-Medford Library decided to enhance, expand, and unify our digitization efforts. The result was Digital PML, a digital collection repository that we built from scratch and completely within our library walls.

For many years, we have been committed to digitizing our rare and eclectic local history materials to increase community access and to support genealogical and historical research. This includes our Flickr-based historic photograph collection, Records of Men from Patchogue and Vicinity Who Took Part in the World War, and the many items presented on the website of our Celia M. Hastings Local History Room.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.